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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
technological surprises from harming national security. the life science pros jects are rooted in military needs like meeting the threat of microbes or treating brain injury in the battlefield but they promise to transform civilian medicine. darpa specializes in high reward research. many of its projects sound like science fiction. when completed isu
for the democrats. and there are folks who with political science looking at this who will say that latinos are really -- that republicans are leaving a lot of latino votes on the table because they're not participating in a comprehensive immigration reform, and i think that that's something that we're going to start to see change. yeah. >> and let me just add to that, too. you touched on it earlier, josh, this whole idea of the divide, the economic divide and the haves and the have-nots, and certainly, latino voters are part of the have-nots in many occasions. the occupy movement, which really got started in 2011, but really exploded in places like oak laerland earlier this year. what impact do you think that had on the national conversation? >> i think it enshrined a place in the national dialogue for issues like income disparity. i mean, the whole fiscal cliff situation is very much, look at the way that's being framed. 98% versus 2%. it's very close to the 99% that was the rallying cry of occupy, and the same thing with the argument over jobs versus austerity. are we going to go the way
was first in awarding engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect would -- wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that innovation cannot occur. and that is the main reason that companies that try to be innovative are not inn
master it." "it is almost a science, and yet if is a puzzle without an answer. it requires complete concentration and total relaxation. it satisfies the soul, fortifies the intellect. it is at the same time, rewarding and frustrating." mr. palmer, we had your golf partner's statute shipped in here, too. i think he just dropped the potter. -- putter. [laughter] i thought -- i am not a great golfer, but as a psychologist, i understand the psychology of the sport in that sense. and i thought, since there's probably one our two call first -- golfers here, i can probably pass on to you what i think is the greatest golf device ever, and it is a story about mr. palmer and the manager of the detroit tigers. i was having dinner with jim, who is also known to have a colorful word or two when he speaks, and he told me about a round of golf he was playing with arnold palmer. he was chipping everywhere but the affair with. -- but the fairway. i am sure that he had a word or two. after a few holes or so, mr. palmer said to him "jim, which you like a little advice?" think about that. if any of us
is look through the social science research of the last ten years and religious diversity whether it is work by robert putnam at harvard or princeton or pew and galloped and brown and all the social science research and ask the question of effectiveness. what does this teach us? and what you come up with is a very simple model called the interfaith triangle. we know based on the social science research that if you know one person of a different religious background. if you have a single meaningful relationship with the mormon or in evangelical or a muslim or a jew, your attitude toward that whole community improves. in fact, we also know from the social science data that your attitude toward other religious communities improves. we also know that if you have what we call appreciative knowledge of a different religion, something as simple as being about the place of the profit mohammad within islam that your attitude towards that improves. those three things, attitude, knowledge, relationships, deeply connected. what is an effective interface program? by the way, this might sound s
foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed. >> warner: this morning, the senate's democratic majority leader, harry reid, was blunt about chances for a deal. and he blamed house speaker john boehner. just before christmas, boehner floated his so-called "plan b"-- letting taxes rise on millionaires. but faced with opp
expectancy. it was, and still is, an assumption that as science and the rationality -- as the disenchantment of the world's, pre-modern forces will lose their history. the two most important of these are religion. events refute the liberal expectancy. religion still drives history. religion is also central to the emergence of america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending specialists by distortion through compression, what we offer a very brief placement of americans foundries. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. this spot is a convenient demarcation. the agents -- ancients saw to enlarge the likelihood of the emergence of noble leaders. machiavelli, however, took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew that nothing would ever be made from the crooked timber of humanity. machiavelli was no democrat. he reoriented politics towards accommodations, strong and predictable forces rising from a great constant, human nature common to all people in all stations. for 44 years, machiavelli and luther
this evening's collaboration of our national news and science programs. yesterday, she sat down with education secretary arne duncan for the special. it was the former chicago public school superintendent's first interview since the killings. here's part of their conversation. >> secretary duncan where does the responsibility lie for action here? >> it lies on all of us. all of us as parents, as community leaders, as religious leaders, as political leaders. no one gets to pass on this. and this is to the a time to point fingers or lay blame. often these things, there are lots of inclinations to do that but this is complex and anyone who wants to say there is a simple answer here i think does a great disservice to the complexity and urgency of fundamentally trying to make our country a safer place for our children. >> ifill: the president has asked the committee that you will be on, that vice president biden is going to spearhead to come up with solution or approaches within a month, before the state of the union speech. do you worry that the outrage is going to fade before that happens? >> i d
. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again today, with the emotional wounds from a school massacre still fresh. there were more fatal shootings, including one in western new york, where an attacker lay in wait for a fire crew. >> responding firefighters when they pulled up on the scene started receiving -- were fired upon. >> police speaking shortly after a home and car erupted in flames. it was arson they said later that turned out to be an ambush. >> it does appear that it was a trap that was set. for responding first responders. >> gunmen killed two volunteer firefighters and wounded two others then killed himself. police identified him as william sp
. so, yes, i am unaffiliated. host: here is the "christian science monitor," their cover. the new face of faith. what is happening in new england, the countries most secular region, may have a future of american religion. traditional religions are seeing their ranks thinned out while alternative churches are becoming more popular. the arc is symbolic of a transforming religious landscape in new england -- will read a little bit more from the magazine piece this morning to continue to give your thoughts on religion and whether it and loved politics. loraine and michigan. republican number. caller: it influences my voting because -- acs, like before, that is a religion. i should have a right to vote with our savior. a country founded on the bible is not a country at all -- makes it very clear. you have to have your belief system. without it, i think a that will exist. host: kathleen, of riverside, ohio. democratic caller. caller: i grew up catholic and went to catholic school but i am no longer a catholic. i would not define myself as a catholic. i got into comparative religious studies
and they go up to 30 days. some say they never return gifts but they have that technique down to a science. >> they will exchange it or they usually give you a store credit if i don't want it. >> other people say instead of trading something they don't want give it to charity. >>> these are pictures of the dolphin after her send off in the marine islands. she was found mall your rushed and with a bite mark on her neck last month. she was transferred where after many weeks of treatment she was nursed back toth. >>> a dog became an international sensation. this dog appears to have beaten cancer but she needs more treatment for heart worm before her face wound can be closed. she lost her snout when she threw herself in front of a motorcycle to save two young girls in the philippines. i understand it is very shrill are you so give yourself some extra time because we are going slowly. you can traffic there, they are the headlights as you head towards northbound in santa clara and in fremont you can see the same story, it is definitely wet thought but traffic seems to be moving along quite nicel
is something. >> we can get more of these. >> it's down to a science now. >> can we do this. >> 34. >> 25 now. >> a girl would be happy with a pink monkey. >> we keep track of them by age, by year. >> two, one, yay. >> the gifts we give out are from infants to 13 years old. last year we probably had 15 carts loaded up with gifts. you people are so awesome we really appreciate this. >> the kids just love meeting santa. >> he's so excited to meet santa claus right now. >> come meet santa. >> hohoho, merry christmas. >> the family gets their picture taken with santa. >> big smiles, there you go. >> merry christmas. >> are you going to ask me what i want for christmas. >> what do you want for christmas? >> a monster truck, a real one. >> we have probably about 500 children. >> we started out with five right now. >> my grandma is a go getter. she just loves what she does and she's so good at it. it's just part of her personality that's how it's gotten where it's reached where it has. >> good job pedro. >> thank you. >> we came out here the first year to do santa and i don't know it just grew on us
what a deal. >> here is something. >> we can get more of these. >> it's down to a science now. >> can we do this. >> 34. >> 25 now. >> a girl would be happy with a pink monkey. >> we keep track of them by age, by year. >> two, one, yay. >> the gifts we give out are from infants to 13 years old. last year we probably had 15 carts loaded up with gifts. you people are so awesome we really appreciate this. >> the kids just love meeting santa. >> he's so excited to meet santa claus right now. >> come meet santa. >> hohoho, merry christmas. >> the family gets their picture taken with santa. >> big smiles, there you go. >> merry christmas. >> are you going to ask me what i want for christmas. >> what do you want for christmas? >> a monster truck, a real one. >> we have probably about 500 children. >> we started out with five right now. >> my grandma is a go getter. she just loves what she does and she's so good at it. it's just part of her personality that's how it's gotten where it's reached where it has. >> good job pedro. >> thank you. >> we came out here the first year to do santa and i
science-fiction boot camp and teachers comment into a week. i did weeks work out which i was told when everyone cries and has service break downs, indeed they do, which was great. at one point, one of my guys took me aside and said how can you tell which of us is going to make it? and i said no. he said that some of us are brilliant and some of us aren't. and can't you tell? is that the ones who make it will be the ones who write and write and write in some of the ones who are brilliant they have written brilliant stories and never write again. but the ones who get in there and write every day and finish stories ebony finish stories and write the next time, they will make it. and i saw him about four months ago in arlington as he was nominated for a nebula award. he didn't get the award, but still very proud of him. my wife and i have both the audio book versions. as such each voice actor. did you have those choices in mind is your writing the book? i suppose it did, but i also had to cheat because i had to steal some of the ones i like from the tv series. the ones i did like i substit
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financialor literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations.ra and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation forr public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> mike: from paint to pet food, hats to barbecue. as a nation, we make millions of products every year. but have you ever wondered just how those things are made and what drives those companies? tonight in this "n.b.r." special edition "made in america" we go to towns small and large to meet unique businesses building jobs and profits. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." good evening, i'm mike hegedus with an n.b.r. special edition, made in america. walking down kentucky street in downtown petaluma, california, but it could be anywhere, u.s.a. this is where sm
railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation and union bank. >> at union bank our relationship managers work hard to know your business. offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> egypt's new constitution is approved by more than 60% of voters who took part in the referendum. queen elizabeth h
this collaboration of all our national news and science programs. check your local listings. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. we'll see you online and, as it's looking like the end is not upon us yet, again here monday evening. have a nice winter weekend. thanks for joining us. good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to le a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> good morning. i'm victor blackwell in for carol costello. stories we're watching in "the newsroom" the opening bell at the new york stock exchange rang just a few seconds ago. stocks are poised to open with lower, open lower rather with much of their attention still focused on that fiscal cliff. ringing the opening bell today the startup weekend leadership team. >>> tributes are pouring in this morning for retired general norman schwarzkopf, stormin' norman as he was known died yesterday. he became a household name in the '90s as he led america to victory as commander of coalition forces during the first gulf war. schwarzkopf was 78. >>> craft store giant hobby lobby is bracing for a $1.3 million a day fine. it starts january 1st for bucking some of the rules in the affordable health care law. you see the company opposes providing some contraceptives to its employees tough its company health care plan citing religious grounds. the company says some contraceptive pro
science director at north carolina. he received his ph.d. from the university of california san diego. he was part of a team of analysts who correctly predicted the outcome of the popular vote to in this year's presidential election between mitt romney and president obama. today he will give us an overview of the events and values that shaped the 2012 election, while giving us an inside look at the challenges and choices, public opinion it researchers face and pre- election polls. please join me in welcoming him to the taubman center. [applause] >> thank you. it is always a pleasure. always a fun time to talk about what we find in the polls, and the polling process after an election. this is a time where us in the business think a lot about what is going on and how effective pulled far at capturing public feelings. certainly we all have our feelings crossed -- fingers crossed going into election be e outcome. i thought i would start by talking about the election and what i thought the challenges were that they would face and how it played out over the course of that from our perspective,
than politics. art, culture, religion, science, philosophy, sports. whether the empire got it right last week, whether or not the nature of dark matter is going to be first discovered by michael businesses rather than astrophysicists. this is all part of speech and thought that is protected by the first amendment. can't think of it just in political terms. then there's a third dimension, that speech is what allows you to define your persona and your personality. your speech, your thoughts, your belief, are who you are. and this is an essential human right. now, the supreme court in its first amendment case has protected speech. that is habeas -- habeas. we only get those cases. [laughter] >> we had a case recently protecting speech, video where there was described to me, i never look at these things, women in spiked heels killing little animals. we protected that. it was protected speech. we protected speech on the day of a funeral of a servicemen killed in the middle east. there were protesters and using derogatory words about gays, saying that the military would be doomed because
department of public safety to have a special agent from the eye or a division of investigation from science to investigate misconduct. the agent is conducting multiple investigations into the ballot fraud, voting by individuals who are ineligible and the double voting. since august of 2012 they have been filed in the conduct cases based on information received from my staff, the local election officials and members of the public. anyone who says voter fraud does not exist should like the numbers produced in the short months. we all know that criminal investigations take time and we expect more charges related to the misconduct to be filed in the coming months. in our efforts to insure integrity my office has taken several steps to maintain accurate voting lists in order to prevent people from taking advantage and election system. first, iowa has won numerous states participating in the project. the purpose of which is to identify voters that may be registered or voting in more than one state. second, i love match of the voting registration records with the social security administration mor
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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